February 2017 STEM Challenge

Happy New Year!

To kick off a new year for all of us, and a new semester of graduate school for me, it’s time to try a new way of communicating.  I’m certainly going outside of my comfort zone here…

Can you feel the love?  View the video below to learn more about what our classrooms plan to use to integrate STEM in the month of February.  While certainly rough around the edges, I will explain a Cupid’s Arrow Challenge including tips, tricks, reminders, and extensions.  Students will need minimal materials:  craft sticks, string or rubber bands, scissors, and cotton swabs for arrows.  Click below to learn more!

Want to try it yourself?  Click below to link up to Teachers Pay Teachers where I bought this challenge and corresponding close reading activity.

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https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Cupids-Arrow-Valentines-Day-STEM-challenge-2289986

Do STEM Challenges leave you stumped?  Take a look at a few pictures of completed Cupid’s Bow and Arrow challenges from around the web.  As is the nature with such design challenges, there are many, many ways to solve these challenges.

cupids-arrow

Still skeptical?  Watch the following short video where a young man shows a very simple way to build a great bow!  Your kiddos are going to love it!

Poem in Your Pocket Day 2016

There is just something about pocket-sized anything that is so appealing!

I’ll be honest, I had never heard of of Poem in Your Pocket Day until I read this post by Shannon Miller.  Here is a description of Poem in Your Pocket Day from the Academy of American Poets:

Every April, on Poem in Your Pocket Day, people celebrate by selecting a poem, carrying it with them, and sharing it with others throughout the day at schools, bookstores, libraries, parks, workplaces, and on Twitter using the hashtag #pocketpoem. 

Poem in Your Pocket Day was originally initiated in 2002 by the Office of the Mayor, in partnership with the New York City Departments of Cultural Affairs and Education, as part of the city’s National Poetry Month celebration. In 2008, the Academy of American Poets took the initiative to all fifty United States, encouraging individuals around the country to join in and channel their inner bard. In 2016, the League of Canadian Poets extended Poem in Your Pocket Day to Canada.

Poem in Your Pocket Day 2016 was held on April 21

I just knew my classes had to participate!

I started with awesome poetry from the Poetry 180 program.  Poetry 180 is designed to bring a different poem to high school students each day of the school year.  I sampled a few of the poems before sharing it with my sixth graders and found them to be appropriate.  [Note, I would use caution with younger students.  You may want to hand-select poems from the site to provide age-appropriate reading material for the younger grades.]

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I let the children analyze two poems using the Poetry Peace Map Method by Lauren Candler.  You can preview this method of exploring poetry with this link.  They selected their favorite, and edited this Canva from Shannon Miller with their poems.  We printed three copies on standard paper.  We placed one copy in our pockets, put another copy in a basket, and a third copy was hung outside our classrooms to celebrate and share!  I also adjusted the document, selected four of my favorites, and printed four to a page.  I placed them outside of my classroom for students and teachers place in their pockets.  The more, the merrier!

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The students were surprised to find that they actually liked some of the poems.  In fact, I have even caught some of them reading from Poetry 180 during Free Reading time!  I would highly encourage you to participate for Poem in Your Pocket Day next year.

Poem in Your Pocket 2016

 

 

Fear Project Reflection Video

So, what did the kids really think about the Fear Project?  I decided to ask them.  First, they created reflection posts on Kidblog.  You can view some of them here:

Mrs. Lavallee’s Homeroom Kidblog Posts

I selected some of my favorites to feature in this Animoto video.

I am so proud of the sincerity, honesty, and thoughtfulness displayed in this student reflection video.  Sixth graders have so much potential.  I am lucky to work with them!

The Fear Project

This has been an amazing year for me as a professional.  I hope my students have learned that any effort, no matter how small they believe it may be, is enough to impact a community.

Children Helping Children Overcome Fears at Cecil Intermediate School’s Maker Space Whether you are the chief of…

Posted by Canon-McMillan School District on Friday, April 8, 2016

Sew What’s New?

albert einstein creativityThings are about to get really interesting around here!  See how we will be using our new Makerspace and integrating making into our reading!

Animal Snoops with Chatterpix Kids

chatterpixkidsChatterpix Kids by Duck Duck Moose

Price:  FREE

Age Scale: 4+

Device: iPhone, iPod, and iPad

Quick Line: Give Your Photos a Voice

What Educators Need to Know:

Our reading series is challenging.  The lexile levels are much higher than in previous grade levels, the topics are mature, and the writings are often lengthy.

But the truth is, this text is REAL.  These are real stories by real authors published in real magazines, books, and on websites. This, along with interesting themes, seems to be enough to keep my busy sixth graders enduring and persisting when material gets tough.

Take, for example, our recent informational piece entitled, “Animal Snoops”.  In a series of engaging and entertaining anecdotes, students learn about animals who eavesdrop on each other to find food, to connect with a mate, and avoid being prey.  It wasn’t easy, but they GOT IT.  Only fair of me to reward their hard work with a little fun, right?

Each student took the perspective of one of the snooping animals in the piece.  They wrote a first-person paragraph explaining why and how the animal spies and used the Chatterpix Kids app to animate their ideas.  The result?  Funny little stories that demonstrate understanding anecdotes and how animals spy on one another.

Take a look:

Sperm Whale by Libby C.:

Bottlenose Dolphin by Madeliene P.:

 Photuris firefly by Brooke P.: